Impact Blog

I have been thinking about all that is going on right now in the Impact world. This morning I received pictures of the new piggery in Kalonga. The roof was completed just today. Now our Ugandan partners have doubled their capacity to raise and house pigs–-to about 70. Pigs are one of the most profitable ventures we have in Kalonga, helping to pay for food for orphans, teachers’ salaries, and starting new ventures for women-at-risk. Besides the piggery, a deep well is being dug right now. The water will be pumped up to a tank on a small tower which will provide drinking water, not only for the children at Hope and Care School, but will allow school and community gardens to be planted. This well is a huge step forward.  Read More

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Checkout the Latest: A Great Week In the Impact Nations World by Steve Stewart

Yesterday the team headed to a new village, Kantegalamire. It is a very interesting place, indeed. Although it is less than 10 miles from Kalonga, this village of 5,000 is remarkably isolated; in fact it feels like it’s a hundred miles away. I was surprised to discover that the people speak a different language from those in the surrounding towns and villages. This is because Kantegalamire was populated by a nomadic tribe a number of years ago. We found out that we are the first “musungus” (white people) to come in 15 years. The medical clinic that we set up yesterday was the first ever in this community. When we arrived, there was a large crowd waiting outside. Once again, the doctors and nurses reported that they encountered a lot of very sick people. Like the last village and Sango Bay, this has been a very bad year for malaria. There were also many serious stomach problems. While the nurses and doctors saw patients for hour after hour, the prayer team prayed for hundreds Read More

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Checkout the Latest: Steve's Third Report from Uganda: Jan 2016

Laughter and joking fills the shop and spills out into the street.  They are so happy, so full of life and hope.  Ben, who is currently in Kalonga, said that it is like a different group of people.  He hardly recognized Jane.  Could this be the same woman he interviewed nearly two years ago? Could this be, the woman whose face was downcast, whose children were sitting in the dirt, clad in scraps of dirty clothes, the one with nowhere to go and no way to feed her children?  Today, she is smiling and laughing, with a new hairdo, looking healthy and strong.  She is one of the women who received a quarter acre of farmland and has built a home for her family.  She is also one of the ten women who are working in the newly opened sewing shop.  Read More

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Checkout the Latest: Sewing Shop Starts Strong

I finished my last report on Friday afternoon. That evening we had an outdoor meeting in Kitango. There were many healings and salvations. Kenneth addressed a group of young men who had come forward to receive Christ. It was great to see him speaking to these very sincere young men, sharing with them about what it means to be a disciple of Jesus. Once again, cataracts left, ears were opened, pain left. However, one healing stands out. I was brought to a girl about 12 years old who was obviously blind in one eye. Years earlier, she had been stabbed in that eye. I prayed for her twice but nothing appeared to happen. I then moved on to pray for others, but a couple of the team kept at it. By the time they had to go, this girl could count fingers, see colors and see people. If you could have seen her severely damaged eye, you would have been amazed.  Read More

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Checkout the Latest: Uganda Journey: Fourth Report

As I write this, I am waiting at the hotel in Mityana for the team to arrive. They are coming in from all over the world. We will spend two days here on orientation, preparing buckets for water filters and getting meds ready for the clinics. We are doing some things for the first time on this Journey. For one, instead of doing 6 medical clinics, we are only doing two. On the other days, we will go house to house providing medical care (where needed), distributing anti-parasite medicine and mosquito nets (the single most effective way to reduce the rate of malaria), and pray for the sick. In the evenings, we will gather at a central outdoor place in the villages and conduct a healing and evangelism meeting.  Read More

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Checkout the Latest: Uganda Report #2: "And it shall prosper..."